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] >>> tonight on c-span the house intelligence committee holds a hearing ons nsa surveillance program and later trayvon martin's mother testifying at the hearing on stand your ground laws. .. only those recognized to speak will be allowed to. >> and those who are not in compliance will be removed from the committee room. i would like to welcome our first panel today. the director of the national intelligence james clapper deputy attorney james cole national security or keith alexander the deputy director of the nsa chris ingalls. following the first panel we will move immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing will provide an open forum to discuss amendments to the surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled at the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how the proposal is under consideration in congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks before they occur and encourage members to answer questio
nsa programs that included spying on foreign leaders in a house intelligence hearing today. in the testimony, national intelligence director james clapper and nsa director keith alexander says data collected was provided to the nsa by other country's intelligence agencies. this hearing is chaired by michigan congressman mike rogers. [inaudible conversations] >> i'll only accept the decorum and only those recognized to speak. i'd like to welcome the first pam today, director of the national intelligence, james clapper, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how propos
.s. news about nsa spying on its allies. did you know that was being done. >> guest: europe in s foreign country. we collect foreign intelligence. in best interest, from national security standpoint and other interests as well. as you heard keith alexander say, much of that data collection has been used to help avert props in europe that might have effort wise happened. so our allies ben from the collection we do and that is important national security issue, that we do collect foreign intelligence. host host chairman diane fines stein, democrat fromce californ, said yesterday that the intelligence panel has been left in the dark about a program that has been occurring over the last decade. >> guest: i don't know what goes on in senate intelligence. i know what goes on in the house intelligence. we have keith alexander up often what is going on in the intelligence activities, data collection. c cia is up there often to do the oversight responsibility. i don't feel that april in the house side, i don't know what goes on in the senate. >> host: you were briefed as a we were spying on u.s.
because i think at nsa we are really worried about conflation of the public record. so what, using the terry stop standard means, the comparison to stop and rest. that would mean a police officer write down the reason for a stop and frisk as we do for the telephone metadata. only one of 22 supervisors approve the stopped and frisked before it would happen. and in our case, the data is all anonymous as opposed to the stop and frisk the point in front of you. the stop and frisk standard we have post in query audits every 90 days, as when a police department audits every 90 days what happens. and we also report to court every 30 days and get it free authorized every 90 days. so while yes, in a legal sense, the legal standard in the lives from the terry stop standard i think just those factors alone distinguished the use of that standard in this context and clearly evidence that the far, far more regulated and rigorous process than is feasible in the search context. >> thank you. i'm going to open with kind of a general question. since the revelation of the 215 program, which wasn't se
about. what i want to talk about is the fact that the nsa surveillance has been going on further than the bush era. it's been going back to late jay edgar hoover when the eavesdrop on martin luther king jr. and they blackmailed him. i think it's kind of like synonymous with what's going on with mark kell. i was wondering if he could speak i'm not. thank you. >> guest: i don't know what your question is. but the nsa which didn't exist until 1952 by the way, the nsa has, according to the revelations of that we are now seeing from edward snowden has gone on to what anyone realize beyond the wiretapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. it's hard to believe a terrorist would call her up and say i'm a terrorist and just that i would let you know we are going to blow up a building. doesn't sound very likely that they should be doing that. at least that's my opinion. >> host: what do you make of the revolution's overall but the work the nsa is doing and how that either helps or contributes to what the work at the fbi and the cia do? >> guest: well, the fbi is an important agency obviou
. the most damaging thing taken place in the last year is not the fight over the budget, but the nsa controversy, the irs controversy, all that, which is not only been dismissed by the government, but defended by the president saying that, well, that's just them. i didn't do that. nebraska's been punished for these things, and people are beginning to become afraid of the very government, and that's the danger to the democratic system. >> anyone else with a quick comment? >> i think also the kind of spending that happened with the stimulus and how it's very apparent that a lot of federal funding goes towards politically connected groups of people just as well as certain law changes like delaying the employer mandate, but keeping the individual mandate on the books when it comes to the president's health care law. i think people are paying more attention. they have more access to more varied view points on what's happening in washington, and they learn too many of our lawmakers are not representing the interests of the american people well, but their own interests and interest of well
and civil liberties oversight board discuss changes to the nsa's data collection and surveillance programs. and later the senate's back to work on a bill to end workplace discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people followed by votes on judicial nominees to the u.s. district courts. >> the woodrow will soften center recently hosted a discussion with the chief of the international atomic energy agency, yukiya amano. he addressed his agency's role in the monitoring programs of iran, north korea and syria. his remarks ran about 50 minutes. >> good morning. welcome to the wilson center. a special welcome to our guest this morning, director yukiya amano of the international atomic energy agency, the iaea. i'm mike van diewns, executive vice president. modern technology kept our president and ceo, jane harmon, on the tarmac in new york city, rather, at laguardia airport for over two years ago this morning. she has just landed and will be here shortly and will make a closing comment. she apologizes, but we wanted to get started. the wilson center is a public very private i
by the n.s.a. because a few numbers may solve an authorized investigation. supporters of bulk collection practices have defended this program as an important tool in the fight against terror. they have said that this is a mechanism to access the logs quickly and they are not actually listening to the content. president obama even said, and i'll quote, "when it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your telephone call. instead, the government was just sifting through this so-called met aadata" madam president, the president is right. they are not listening to the actual calls like the f.b.i. conducting a wire tavment but let me outline that the government can figure out what is going on i from those call logs. for example, they will know that an american citizen in nevada received a call from the local n.r.a. office and then called their representative and senators. but they claim that the content of that call remains safe from government intrusion. or they'll also know that a nevadan from las vegas called a suicide prevention hotline and spoke to an individual for 12 minutes.
security of for a contract known to as nsa west to do real-time surveillance of residence in the city of oakland. as you know, it was involved in the occupied movement and we had 10 percent as the 47th largest city in the country but 10 percent of the occupied arab press were here. in the context of the work against the main awareness center what type of citizen or resident organizing are you aware of with the development of the anti-crime and explicit use of these technologies? >> what did under -- whenever you are undertaking locally i am not aware of that much organizing i am interested. scic i doubt it gets a lot of money and a lot of grants to makes of the threat assessment to justify that funding. individuals involved so we had to fabricate it i have a few examples. they are ludicrous. i will try to find out what is happening more. thank you. >> three quick questions i will go fast i read about unity with other countries with fiber-optic saw that it is a pipe dream is it even possible? that was a defeat the intelligence gathering of the nsa. bisected question would be how do yo
there is a dangerous addiction to the remote warfare. lot nsa has been doing a avoiding putting troops on the ground and it always reminds me but war is so dangerous often it is perceived from cold hearted this and i think the worst american is to minimize the danger in damage that conflict does and one of those is the reliance on remote forms of technology to compensate our willingness to put troops on the ground. one of the only things that stops human beings from fighting is they have had a tough if you outsource to robots to create a precedent we can tell anybody anytime across the planet provided it meets us it could bounce back at some point. >> host: i see that. it a related question is clap conflicts in the past are relevant to the world you forsythe and what countries our best placed because of their experiences that they intend to it will translate to what comes next. with iraq or afghanistan it is hard to realize how good people have got and what they are doing. it is only in the realms of special forces. the capability not only of the ad agencies and a state department is unparalleled in
>> they sent nsa letters country teaking how you do or don't do your job and only learn about it when some more intelligence is disclosed from leakers. i want to know, and this would also require all denials and modification of fisa orders and now or changedded legal interpretation of fisa, and i'd like to know from you, and we start with general alexander, would there be harm to sources and methods to making this change? >> well, knot as you described it, but i'm not familiar with it. i'll pass it down to the attorney general. not that i know of, but i'm not, at least the way you've described it giving access to the committee on certain things, it is our intent any time we see significant like that is to report it to the committee, so we would never want to -- >> just seems to me they have a different window, i say a better window, to what's going on, and anything they see as an issue should be shared with us so if there needs to be changes made, we could do that. mr. cole? >> congressman, i think the real issue comes down do what is in the application, what is in the order,
a yahoo! address and they passed it to the nsa, which went and started monitoring the e-mail address. as soon as the e-mail came in from the united states, to that address, the nsa passed it to both n.y.p.d. and officials in colorado. i have been in rapid succession. i think that is a good take away for coming in now, for cooperation post-9/11, the real good cooperation does work frankly, thetraditional pic rankly the traditional police work for amed work for the fbi for so many decades that have kind of come under scrutiny and maybe people think don't work to fight terrorism like lady maranda lights are questioning them over a long period of time, watching and waiting. those kinds of things in the end, does work. and you know, we didn't need secret presents. we didn't need waterboarding. we didn't need guantÁnamo bay. collaboration and smart policing work to keep america safe. >> host: how are you able to get access to these records? >> guest: adam goldman, my co-author and i reported for "the associated press." for about 18 months through 2011 to early 2013, we were reporting on t
nonfiction books and authors. booktv every weekend on c-span2. >> this is a tough time for nsa where everybody says what are you doing or why are you doing it. here's what we do. when we get together we don't -- to be a couple times we whine, but we actually say, it is much more important for this country that we defended this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend, intelligence officials defended the nsa surveillance program. this morning at 10 eastern. live sunday on c-span2 your calls and comments for kitty kelley, best selling author of unauthorized biographies. on c-span trees and american history to become each weekend in november remembering john f. kennedy. sundays at 3 p.m. eastern. >> and now from the 18th annual texas book festival in austin, texas, a discussion with author mark binelli. his book "detroit city
about the drone attacks. the nsa revelations have undermined some confidence. now, there's a number of different reasons, but i think what i'm going to do is point out the reasons why i think we have not had as much success as we had hoped in terms of building broad support for our campaign and, second, what we ought to do about it. i think the reasons why are fairly clear. number one, as i mentioned, is the drone strikes. it has gotten a fair amount of attention. you know, the number of civilian casualties, the justification for those attacks. the world is focused on this. now, i do believe that drones are getting an unfair portion of the blame here. a drone is a weapon of war. i don't think the rest of the world would feel any better if we were launching cruise missiles from out in the ocean. i don't think that changes it. there's a little too much of an emphasis on how this has fundamentally changed things, that a drone is more dangerous than sending in a seal team on launching a bunch of cruise missiles. they're not the perfect instrument they are sometimes described to be, and
that's the nsa program on gathering meta data or look at internet traffic or suspicious -- or local police department which train officers to identify even at times lawful activity like public photography and forward that to a national data base. there's been a shift to collecting lots and lot of data. there's a question whether it's an effective model. you look at, for example, william webster's committee report on the fort hood shooting. one of the conclusions is that the intelligence be the analysts there missed intelligence about hasan in part because of a relentless workload. there's a question about, i mean, in proashial terms whether it's adding more hay to the hay stack and an effective way to police. >> so -- >> thank you for bridging up those point. you also highlighted that law enforcement has a couple of roleses. they have the role of investigating crimes. in today's threat environment some expectations of preventing attacks as well. and george, you mentioned there's a cognizant effort to try to do it within the realm of protecting civil liberty. there's a history of cas
these have occurred. how do i know they occurred? hold on. nsa spies on other people. and so we see what the other people have collected from american companies. of course, the law prevents us from saying here is a big bank. they lost this amount of money. we thought we can't say anything. so the public debate is miss informed in some ways because of a t not established that precisely. there are legal obstacles to information sharing. you've heard about that. i don't know about the antitrust. all the companies say antitrust. i don't know how true it is. the privacy obstacles are more important. there are a few sectors that made progress. i look at financial service and telecom. they made progress because it's in the business interest do better at cybersecurity. other places very little progress. so easy and energetic 12-year-old could probably be a good cyberattacker. i've had some unusual experiences this year. and the one i think the most unusual for me was a big international conference -- which was the shut down? october 17th. i thought people expressing pity for the united. we weren
clapper and nsa direct or general keith allen discussed the nsa surveillance program and spying on foreign governments before the house intelligence committee hearing earlier this week. >> i never expected to write an entire book on cancer until i was diagnosed at a relatively young age. i was diagnosed at 36. i was astonished at how different i thought it was -- how different i was going through treatment than what i had heard about cancer and what i expected cancer be. and i sort of expected it -- i expected it to run like a well oiled machine in which cure wasn't obviously guaranteed, but people knew about my particular cancer at be followed and what i found was being really, really different. i couldn't help but i started to write about it. >> the head of the wrecks on trans next round of talks, george washington university hosted regional experts were monday. a farmer winning presidential candidate and former official at the american embassy in a rant to our commenting on prospects for the agreement. the impact of president rouhani election. nuclear weapons talks begin on november 7.
. >> congratulations, senator. welcome. [cheers and applause] [applause] >> this is a tough time for nsa where they said, what are you doing or why are you doing it? here's what we do. when we get together, we don't -- well, maybe a couple times we whine -- but we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend the nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attackedded. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having begin them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program on a house intelligence committee hearing. saturday morning at ten eastern. live sunday on c-span2, your calls and comments for kitty kelly, best selling author of unauthorized biographies, nancy reagan, the british royal family, the bush family, and others at noon on booktv's "in-depth," and on c-span3's american history tv, each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy, eyewit
in august. they have an opportunity to see what the issues were. nsa previously testified, they did generate an aggressive memorandum laying out new guidance to try and address a lot of the issues. >> how many of the 49 recommendations as the department finished implementing? >> we got a lot of flurry of act to that in the past two days, which is a byproduct of hearing so we are grateful. roughly half is my belief, but we look at you an answer at the precise number for the record. we track these recommendations on a quarterly basis. we send a reminder to the department that this is an open recommendation and how are you progressing on getting to closure on it. it's a process that we've had in place. i'm told now by my colleagues at 26 of the 49 are open. >> 26 out of 49 remain open. there's been some exchange of information back and forth between our follow-up staff and the department, were indications of the progress is being made, but we have not gotten enough information to say they've met the requirements of the recommendation geared >> so their 23 still in process? >> no, they're a 26.
together with nsa's information insurance director, the csp program that dha has goes on and on, and my main point is that private sector and government are working well together. we have align for the right goals, but i don't see a problem in that regard. >> laura? >> yeah, i just want to respond, particularly to dan's points and jim's point. there's a real danger here we think by checking the box we addressed the underlying concern speaking here about privacy. we have a privacy and civil liberties oversight board, no resources, no money, and no teeth; right? the idea we have one, great. we have pias, the records notices, and we have exceptions that are routinely used by dhs and others in sense of the regard of the metric programs. we have a privacy act 40 years old and no longer does what it was set out to do. we have foya with exceptions for gnarl security routinely used to deny reasonable activity. now we've seen with walton releases, and august of this year, it was release reasoning without providing too much information a joshed lying issues, and what we found out is that a secret
with the defense industrial base together with nsa information assurance director, it goes on and on. my main point is a private sector and government are working well together. we have to align for the right goals but i don't see a problem in that regard. >> i want to respond to dan's point. there is a real danger here by checking the box we address the underlying concern and i'm thinking of privacy. we have privacy and civil liberty board with no subpoena authority, no money and no teeth. the idea that we have one great, but what can it do? we have exceptions for national security that are routinely used with regard to the biometric program and the privacy act which is almost 40 years old and no longer does what it set out to do. we have exceptions for national security that are routinely used to design even request for legal reasoning why someone has engage in certain activity. we have seen with judge reggie walton's release in august of this year that actually you can release legal reasoning without providing too much information about the underlying tissues and a secret court secretly carved o
] contractor connected with the nsa, national security. and -- >> host: okay, agnes, i apologize. we've seen -- she's got a lot of connections here, kitty kelley. >> guest: i don't know how to put them all together. i thought she was going to say that she saw this photograph, and they were all white men. and i was ready -- but i don't know quite where she was going with this. but the connection to the nsa brings us back to what the man asked -- >> host: perhaps the power in this town and where does it reside? >> guest: well, it certainly resides here. this is the capital of the country, and the power resides with the supreme court and with congress. and be then with the president. >> host: amy, portland, oregon. when ms.-- i'm just going to read it verbatim -- when ms. kelley leaves this world, what will happen to all of her interview and video recording? >> guest: amy, i do have them all. i do have them all, and i've saved them because you never know -- i did it in the beginning to document all my work for lawyers. i don't know what'll happen to it. >> host: you haven't decided? >> guest: n
on with the national security agency. mr. secretary, to start with you, because you jointly oversea the nsa and as a senior member of the national security committee, clearly, this is in your portfolio as well, so what did you know about collection of intelligence from world leaders communications whether it was data or whatever it was, what did you know about it? when did you know about it, and have you discussed it with the president and feel it appropriate? why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting communications, and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.. first, mr. secretary. >> barbara, i don't discuss conversations i have in national security counsel meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations that we have regarding intelligence. we are examining dynamics out there and procedures and processes, i think, the white house has been very clear on that; and i think those who lead intelligence community even very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, allies who cooperate with us
. [applause] >>> tonight on c-span the house intelligence committee holds a hearing ons nsa surveillance program and later trayvon martin's mother testifying at the hearing on stand your ground laws. ..
and i attended probably 50 to 100 meetings at nsa headquarter at langly at fbi headquarter where all of the attorneys and all the leadership of the criminal programs and intel programs got together and trying to figure out under what circumstance could we work together? how could we share information and gain assistance from the intel community without cardiovascularring them and forming the secret alliance that was not required. now, later the fbi indicted the organization dismanhattan th -- dismantled them. he was trying to perpetrate $150 million fraud on nasdaq. we prevented that. we did a great deal of good in the case. everything was going just wonderfully until -- it wasn't even the defense attorneys, it was doj attorneys going prosecute and oversee the prosecution and show up and say, hi, cia, open your books. we want to see what help you gave the fbi. sources and methods. well, their welcome was soon wornout when they did that. rightfully so. you have two competing interest in the system. a right of a defendant know what the government did to him or her and why. and how and
for nsa. everybody says what are you doing or why are you doing it? but here's what we do. when we get when we get together -- well maybe a couple of times we've wine, but we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program would result in a nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs and having given them up and having the nation or the allies. they defended the program and the house intelligence committee meeting. saturday morning at ten eastern. blasÉ sunday at c-span2 your calls and comments >> asad nassa's future goes, so too does that of america. if nassa is healthy, then you don't need a program to convince people that science and engineering is good to do because you will see it at large on the paper. it will be called for engineers to help us go ice fishing where there is an ocean of water that has been liquid for billions of years. we will dig through the soil and look for life that will give me the best biologists. look
's bradley manning or what happened here at the navy yard, or what appened at or what happened at n.s.a. we have a failure. and the other thing we have is now we know that we have 8,400 people with clearances that don't follow the law paying their taxes and half of them have a top secret clearance. you know, the american people ought to be asking, what in the world is going on. and so my question is, we've now seen outlined who's ultimately responsible for it. that's d.n.i., correct? >> yes, sir. >> and we have the defense department that's making improvements but still has a way to go, and we have failure of contractors and not doing allegedly not doing what they're supposed to do. there's also another i.g. investigation going on along with that. but what's the answer? one of the answers has to be doing the job that we do better, one. number two, the other has to be using data that is available. you know, the form -- where is that form? this form for $20 you can get 90% of the information on the internet. we pay $2,400 for top secret clearance, is that right? that's about what we pay. it's
everything. that name -- [inaudible] contractor connected with the nsa, national security. and -- >> host: okay, agnes, i apologize. we've seen -- she's got a lot of connections here, kitty kelley. >> guest: i don't know how to put them all together. i thought she was going to say that she saw this photograph, and they were all white men. and i was ready -- but i don't know quite where she was going with this. but the connection to the nsa brings us back to what the man asked -- >> host: perhaps the power in this town and where does it reside? >> guest: well, it certainly resides here. this is the capital of the country, and the power resides with the supreme court and with congress. and be then with the president. >> host: amy, portland, oregon. when ms.-- i'm just going to read it verbatim -- when ms. kelley leaves this world, what will happen to all of her interview and video recording? >> guest: amy, i do have them all. i do have them all, and i've saved them because you never know -- i did it in the beginning to document all my work for lawyers. i don't know what'll h
the nsa and the irs targeting and others. those won't go away anytime soon especially angela merkel perhaps the most powerful woman in the world. herself saying this is a compromise between german and u.s. relations and if in fact it's true that this government has been eavesdropping on her calls. we don't know its true right now but is president obama is seen as just another politician or diminishing our profile in the world that would go against frankly what has been his ranch distinction along. >> host: stefan hankin i wanted to follow up on what kellyanne was saying. this is from brett. moderate republicans may defect to the democrats have challenged by the tea party in primaries and i put -- >> guest: i agree with the caveat and this is what i talked about earlier that the democrats and a positive vision of what they stand for. if you look at the republican party broadly he sort of tend to have three groups and you have your evangelicals. you have your tea party and your moderate or establishment republicans and i'm generalizing obviously but certainly they're not going to be w
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)